The Wufoo Blog

Totally New to Wufoo? Welcome To Our Newbie Series (Just For You!)

By Michael Lim · August 6th, 2014

Heads-up, all. We’ve got a new addition to the Wufoo family to introduce you to—Mr. Michael Lim. You’ll be seeing a lot more of Michael on this humble blog of ours so be sure to read. And read closely!

Hi there, form fans! I’m Michael, the newest member of the Wufoo support team. Although I’m originally from Kailua, HI, I graduated from the University of Puget Sound in May and immediately moved down to California. Since then, when I’m not catching up on some sorely missed sunshine, I’ve been learning what Wufoo is all about. I figured this would be a great chance to give you a glimpse of what it’s like to work with Wufoo as a brand new user and share my tips along the way.

(Like our Back To Basics series, if you’re an experienced Wufoo user this post could be a little repetitive for you. But if you’ve got the time, you may want to stick around. You might just learn something new)

Here we go!

When I first got started with Wufoo, the most difficult thing for me was keeping track of all the different features and their terminology. But once I had some time to get used to it, I found that it all started to make sense. For those of you who—like me—are just starting out with Wufoo, here’s a rundown of some of the most often mixed-up terms and phrases:

Words in Wufoo AKA Terms Cheatsheet

Entry: Simply put, an Entry is a single submission of a form. It’s what we measure for your monthly limits, and it’s also how your data is stored for later viewing. In other words, when someone fills out your form, and hits the “Submit” button, that creates an Entry containing the submitted information. This is what gets stored in the Entry Manager the page that shows when you click the “Entries” button under each form.

User: This is a pretty commonly used word, so it’s important to understand what it means in Wufoo. Generally, this refers to someone filling out your form. Whether they used one of the public form links, or your form was embedded on a site, people who fill out your forms are considered users. However, on paid plans, multiple “users” can be created on a single account. To simplify things, it may help to think of these same-account “users” as sub-users, since they have access to the account “under” the main user who created the account.

Account Creator: Technically this refers to a special user on each account. Usually this is the account belonging to the person who first made the Wufoo account, and on Gratis accounts, it’s the only user for the account. However, the Account Creator may be updated after the initial creation, for example if an employee leaves a company, they may pass the account to their successor.

Form Manager: The heart and soul of Wufoo. Sometimes referred to as the “main” page. The Form Manager is what you see when you first login, and it’s where you can access all of your forms, as well as the Entry Manager, Rule Builder, Notifications, and other settings for each form

Form Builder: This is where the magic happens. This is what you’re shown if you click the “Edit” button under a form on the Form Manager. With the Form Builder you can add fields, modify existing fields and their settings, and adjust the Form Settings.

Notifications: These are emails that can be sent to any address that you pre-define in the Notifications menu (via the Form Manager), or in the Form Rules section of the Rule Builder. They are usually used to send a copy of an entry to a relevant party. For example, if you have a Vacation Request form that your employees fill out, you can use Notifications to send a copy of their submission to an HR rep for verification.

Confirmation: The Confirmation email can only be sent to an email address that is part of a form entry. Only one address can receive the Confirmation for a particular entry. You can also choose to send a copy of the entry as part of the email body. Perfect for any situation where your users may want to retain the information they submitted for their records. Private: You can set a form to “Private” by unchecking the “Public” box next to the form in the Form Manager. This means a form will only be accessible through your account. You (and any sub-users on a paid account) can still submit entries from within the Entry manager for the Private form, but the form can not be submitted using a link or embed code.

Protected: Clicking the “Protect” button under a form in the Form Manager allows you to restrict publicly available forms so that they can only be accessed by individuals with the password. This allows for a somewhat semi-private form, in that others unassociated with your Wufoo account can submit entries, but they first need the password. This can be useful if you’re running a private giveaway on your site, and only want users who were emailed a promo code to be able to submit an entry.

Fun Feature Time in Wufoo

So far in my brief time with Wufoo, I’ve discovered a few features I’m particularly fond of. And some fun little surprises along the way.

Template Gallery: It wasn’t until after I had already started making a few forms that I took a look at the Form Gallery. This collection of ideas and examples is a great place to start when designing a new form. Chances are, there’s an existing template that you can use for almost any kind of form you could need. Browsing through the Gallery has also given me some ideas for things Wufoo can do that I would have never expected.

CSS Keywords: Wufoo has some nifty CSS Keywords that make some rather complex layouts achievable with just a few words, no selectors or tags required. Some of my favorites are: hide: Probably one of the most useful. Allows you to make a field invisible to users. Great for including internal information like tracking codes.

hideSeconds: Hides the “seconds” portion of a Time field. I’ve found that I rarely need to collect this level of detail in my forms, so hiding it can save some time.

altInstruct: Moves a field’s instructions under the field, instead of to the side. The altInstruct setting also ensures that instructions are constantly showing. I found this was useful for particularly important instructions that I wanted to always be visible, since the standard “pop up” box on the side can be overlooked. I generally use the standard instructions setting as more of a “tool tip” function, for advice or suggestions on how to fill out a field.

Make new fields (but keep the old): One thing to watch out for is modifying or deleting old fields on a form. Data in existing entries is tied to the actual field that was used on the form, so if you make any changes, or get rid of that field, then the data in your previous entries can be affected. To avoid losing your collected information, try to avoid removing fields from your form once you’ve received entries. Instead, set them to Admin Only or hide them using CSS Keywords to preserve the data in old entries but hide them from on your live form.

Forms Gallery: In college, I often found a need to collect basic information for group projects, club meetings, or just managing my to-do list. More often than not, I used a simple spreadsheet to gather and organize my data. Sometimes I would use Google Form if I needed a little more structure, but I never considered trying a full featured form builder. After using Wufoo for just a short time, I’ve realized I was missing out. Using a template from the Gallery, I can have a form up and running in minutes plus I get the added bonus of built-in Reports, customizable themes, and so much more.

Zapier: I’m always looking for ways to organize and automate my life. Wufoo’s integration with Zapier, a gateway to connecting with dozens of other services, opens up a world of possibilities. Got a booking form, and you want reservation entries to be added to your Google Calendar? Done. Using a form to gather bug reports? Let Zapier automatically create a JIRA Issue. Still not satisfied? Check out the hundreds of other possibilities. (Note: You’ll need a paid Zapier plan to use their “Premium Services.” We don’t have any sort of deal with them, we just appreciate their awesomeness)

And there you have it. Just a few tips to help guide my fellow Wufoo newbies along their way to becoming Wufoo masters. For those of you more advanced readers who stuck with us, thanks for hanging in there! Have advice of your own? Share it with us in the Comments below.

Until next time, friends…


Everything is Gonna Be ModiFINE: How to Modify Your URLs

By Kane Stanley · August 1st, 2014

Don’t you think it would be fantastic if you could open up a form and a load of it was already filled out? It would be like your computer just knew who you were and could fill out forms for you. Not in the scary “Computer’s are taking over the world” kind of way, but more of the “I don’t want to have to fill in all of this information and it already being filled out is pretty great” kind of way.

Fortunately, that’s most definitely possible with Wufoo and some URL modifications. You may have seen the help document we have on URL modifications, but what if you want to see it in action? I’ve got some spare time on my hands, so I’ll take you through how to use URL modifications to pre-fill your form for that special someone who may or may not think computer’s are taking over the world as a result.

Let’s say you have a monthly manager feedback form about each employees job. You want your employees to fill it out about their specific manager each month, but you don’t want them to have to fill out their name and details and also their manager’s name. That would take them time that you’d rather they spend doing something else. Besides, why have them fill out the form in full each month when you can send them a link to the form that’s already filled out for them? That would just be a bit silly.

Firstly, let’s have a quick peek at the feedback form:

Look at that. The form is so lovely and nice, but none of it has been filled out. Now let’s say that there’s an employee called Ryan Irwin. He takes this form loads and he’s sick of having to fill out the first few fields all the time. He always has the same email address, he works in Marketing and his manager is Sally Eastwood. It’s not changing for him, so why give him a blank form all the time? Instead we can edit the URL to fill it in for him when he receives the form. Let’s get started.

Firstly, we’ll have to find out the API Id’s of each field that you want to pre-populate. To do that, we just have to click the ‘Code’ tab on the form and then click ‘API Information’ in the top right corner of the page. Here’s mine:

Right, so now we can see all the API Id’s of each of the fields that we want to pre-populate. Now, all we have to do is plug it into the URL to the form. At the moment, the form will show up blank with this link:

https://kanestanley.wufoo.com/forms/manager-feedback-form/

If we want to fill in all of Ryan Irwin’s details we just have to change the link to:

https://kanestanley.wufoo.com/forms/manager-feedback-form/def/field217=Ryan&field218=Irwin&field219=support%40wufoo.com&field221=Sally%20Eastwood&field213=Marketing

“Phowahh!” You’re probably thinking. “How did he get there?” At first look, it can be a bit scary, but the breakdown should make it easier.

/def/ - When you edit a URL, you have to start defining the additions with /def/ field217= - This is just the API ID of each field followed by an equals to define what you want the field to say. & - If you’re filling in more than one field, you have to separate each one with &. %40 - Now this is a bit confusing. There are some characters that URL’s aren’t cool with so you have to essentially code them in. %40 will create an @ in the field. %20 - Similarly, you can’t put a space in a URL. So %20 creates that space for you! There’s a bunch of these characters that can’t be used in URL’s and the URL modification help article gives you the cheat for all of them.

Now let’s see the finished product:

Sorted. All we would have to do is send Ryan that modified URL and he could use it every time he wants to fill out the form. Simple as that. And there you have it. Next time you want to prepopulate a form, just throw in some modified URL’s and you’ll be off to the races.


Find the Perfect Integrated Wufoo Payment Provider with Our Interactive Form

By Johan Lieu · July 31st, 2014

If you own your own business and want to sell your wares or services online, you’re going to need to figure out how to accept online orders. Luckily for you, it’s never been easier to do just that and with Wufoo, you don’t even need to know how to code. By simply signing up for one of the many payment providers Wufoo has integrated with, you can create your online form and start accepting payments in simply a few minutes.

Before you do that, you’ll probably need to figure out which payment provider is the one for you. Wufoo offers integrations with a wide variety of partners like Stripe, PayPal, and Authorize.Net to name a few. Since we offer so many, we’ve created this handy interactive form to help you figure out the right payment provider for you.

We’ve built this interactive form using Field Rules so that you can simply answer the four short questions on this form and you’ll soon be on your way to figuring the perfect payment provide to integrate your Wufoo forms with and to start accepting payments online. After you take the form, we’ve used our nifty Form Rules so we’ll even email you a confirmation email with our recommendation so you have it for your records.

So what are you waiting for? Take the interactive form and find the right payment provider for you! If you’ve got experience with any of the payment providers and have some recommendations of your own, feel free to share your experiences with others in the Comments below.


Fill out my online form.

The Dos and Don’ts of Form Fields

By Jen Bjers · July 8th, 2014

Hey there, form fans! We’re back again to share more form-building best practices with you—the Dos and Don’ts of form design if you will. Today, I’ll go over the Dos and Don’ts of the fantastic Form Field. Being the forward thinker that you are, intuitive form design is clutch for a positive user experience, but the types of fields you use to collect that data is crucial when it comes to reporting and compiling that information down the road.

Recently, Johan shared 3 Things You Definitely Should NOT Do On Your Forms. I’ll expand on that by highlighting some best practices when choosing field types to collect your data. This guide will cover a handful of Standard and Fancy Pants field types along with tidbits of insight on Field and Form Settings.

Ready? Let’s do this.

I’ve created a form to collect registration information for this summer’s Dino Camp for kids (aka Jr. Archaeologists). This form uses various field types in a way that negatively impacts the user experience as well as potentially skews your data on the backend.

Click on the images below and check out the pointers called out in the field examples:

A few additional resources to help build excellent online forms:

Using Section Breaks to Make Your Forms Easier to Fill Out!

Dynamic Fields for Allowing More than One Camper to Signup per Form

The Science Behind Field Label Placement and Why Top Aligned is Suggested

How to Accept a Terms of Service Agreement

Additional questions for Jen? You know where to go, dear readers.


Back to Basics: How to Search and Export in the Entry Manager

By Zachary Ralson · July 3rd, 2014

Welcome back to another Back to Basics, form fans! So you’ve built that spiffy form of yours (congrats) and now you’re watching all those entries come rolling in (awesome). And rolling in. And rolling in. Sometimes it can feel a little overwhelming to go through all of those submissions and having to wade through the Entry Manager to get the perfect view of the results you’re looking for. If you have 60 results (or even 6 or 600) and you want to get some of them to your friends and colleagues for review, it can be tough to sort through them all to make sure the right data gets to the right place. Fortunately, the Entry Manager’s versatile functionality allows you to filter and export your results so you can make the most of all those form submissions.

The Search Bar

First, let’s look at the Search bar. Much like the legendary Sasquatch, despite its power this feature spends most of its time in hiding. If you click into the bar itself you’re able to search all of your entries for whatever information you’re looking for. But trust us, the search bar is so much more than that.

If you click the magnifying glass icon to the left, the filter options will appear above the entries. You’re able to add filter criteria to limit the Entry Manager display. Most of the time this process is pretty straightforward. Say you wanted to find a list of all Canadian customers with government mailing addresses…You can apply a filter to “Display entries that meet all of the following conditions” add “Country contains Canada” and “Email contains @government.ca” filters to the manager. You’re then able to base filters on any of the fields in your form and use the following conditions:

• Contains • Does not contain • Begins with • Ends with • Is equal to • Is not equal to

There are a few situations where the filter criteria isn’t as simple as the above examples. For example, if you’re filtering by the number of stars provided in a Rating field, you’ll need to use a numeral to represent the number of stars. If you’re sorting by a checkbox option, you’ll need to use the label of the checkbox to successfully filter things. What do we mean exactly? Say the checkbox is labeled, “Yes, I would like to attend your event” and you’d like to find everyone who checked it, you’ll need to say, ‘Yes, I would like to attend your event’ is equal to ‘Yes, I would like to attend your event.’”. If the checkbox is selected then the answer is the same as the label.

Bulk Actions

Now that you’ve limited your search to only your Canadian customers, you want to export those results so you can email them to that naysayer who said you’d never make it big in Toronto (pfft). You can do this by using the Bulk Actions button, conveniently located to the left of the search bar! On the right side of the entry display the Export and Delete buttons will appear.

The Export button allows you to export all entries that are currently displaying in the Entry Manager. If you have no filters applied, this will export all of your entries, if you do have filters applied, only the specified entries will be exported. You’ll have three different format options, as well: Excel (.xls), text (.txt), and Commas (.csv).

The Delete Button is in the same Bulk Actions window as the export button, but it’s key not to mix these up. It operates under the same rules as the Export button—it will only delete those entries that are visible. Need to get rid of any unpaid entries? Go ahead and use the filter to sort them out and just hit Delete.

There you have it, dear form fans. We hope that overwhelming feeling has disappeared into thin air and don’t be shy—let us know if you have questions below!


Customer Spotlight: How Couch Fest Films Uses Wufoo To Run Their Film Festival

By Craig Downing · June 16th, 2014

Like the rest of the natural world, we really dig the movies. Movies in any genre, size, shape or form—all totally cool with us. So when we came across Seattle-based Couch Fest Films and learned how Wufoo’s helping to support their grassroots efforts in distributing independent films, we knew this form story had to be shared. Ready for some action? Craig Downing, the director of Couch Fest Films is here to give you the behind-the-scenes lowdown.

We’re rolling!

We are Couch Fest Films—a shorts film festival held in strangers’ houses all over the world, all on the same day! I’m the director of this scrappy film festival. Initially, we started the festival in order to help people in Seattle open their doors (metaphorically of course) to one other. We’re proud to offer this awkwardly awesome film experience for film lovers all around the world :)

Simply put, we’re using Wufoo to prevent us from going crazy. Fact. Before Wufoo, we had paper applications from filmmakers, notes and random bits of paper unfurling off shelves and spilling out of our pockets. We desperately needed a clean and efficient way to manage the many applications we were receiving. In fact, we use Wufoo for most interactions with our community. Wufoo helps us actually look organized as we collect film submissions, host applications, job applications, press inquiries and press accreditation applications. 



There are many reasons we chose to use Wufoo. We liked that the form lives within the ecosystem of our webpage. As a team, we fought for months designing our page. After having passionate debates over whether a page margin should be 1 pixel or 2 pixels, it would’ve been such a heartbreak to have our users leave our site when using a form. So, we were relieved when we saw that Wufoo had the option of embedding a form right into our website. Users stay within the ecosystem of our website for the entire process even when making payments. Yes! 



We also loved the form logic option for our forms. Having form logic, dynamically changed the options the user is seeing on the page so that they’re only shown relevant questions and not bogged down with questions that don’t pertain to their submission. Genius!

All of our internal teams are using Wufoo as we collect info. Our film team is able to collect all the information needed from filmmakers submitting their work for the chance to play worldwide. The outreach team uses Wufoo for those interested in hosting films in their community. HR accepts job and intern applications thanks to Wufoo. And the marketing department can quickly and easily accept press accreditation applications. We’d be crippled without the ability to easily collect info and payments internationally for our film festival.

Many times our team is sneaking around film festivals looking for the very best films to showcase. So, it’s rare that we operate as a traditional office. Typically, we kind of squat cafes around the world managing our festival. Wufoo allows us to decentralize our office. We can manage submissions online no matter where we are at in the world.

In addition, it makes it easier for us to receive international submissions since they can submit online bypassing any shipping fees. In fact, when we were invited to Iceland, Wufoo allowed us to operate with this change without any hiccups.
 We’re also really excited that because of Wufoo’s flexibility, we’re the first film festival in the world to be able to accept Bitcoins for film submission fees. This would’ve been impossible for us without Wufoo. Fact.

To be honest, there are so many experiences to think of. When we first discovered Wufoo, we annoyed our friends and roommates pining about the service. It was so refreshing to find a product that clearly was being used by the same people who designed it. How could we tell? Because of the details. Everything was so seamless. We noticed the interface, the endless options, the colors, the human customer service and the little funny notes built into the instructions. It’s been such a pleasure interfacing with Wufoo and it’s so evident how committed the developers are to Wufoo.

Overall, for us, it was as if Wufoo time traveled into the future, figured out exactly how we would use forms, came back from the future and then built this tool for us. You won’t be able to convince us otherwise. I know we’re gushing here but we had tried so many other options that were just okay and we felt like these other tools had been built and then abandoned by their developers. Wufoo is always adapting with the dynamically changing needs of the Interne and this attention to detail and commitment to innovation does not go unnoticed with the entire team at Couch Fest.

Here’s an e-chestbump to Wufoo for all the amazing support you’ve provided us. Totes!

Are you a budding filmmaker and interested in learning more about those awesome chest-bumbers over at Couch Fest Films? Check ‘em out here.


Back To Basics: Wufoo Integrations

By Johan Lieu · June 13th, 2014

It’s time for another edition of our Back To Basics series. In this edition, we’re going to take a look at Wufoo’s integrations with other applications and web sites and show how they can save you time, make your life easier, and make your Wufoo forms powerful and extensible.

As always, our Back To Basics series is aimed at newer Wufoo customers and users who might not yet be familiar with the wealth of features Wufoo offers. It might be too simplistic for some Wufoo Vets but I bet if you stick around, you might learn something new that you can do with Wufoo. And if not, you might be able to share your experiences with other Wufoo users and help make everyone’s life that much better. Either way, onward!

What Are Integrations?

If you’re not familiar with the idea of integrations, here’s your crash course. Integrations are features Wufoo and other sites have built that allow you to extend the functionality of your Wufoo account and forms.

Most Wufoo integrations work by connecting your Wufoo account or form to a 3rd party application or web site. After connecting, new entries submitted to your Wufoo forms will be automatically sent over to the 3rd party app or web site where the entry can be parsed, processed, and used for a bunch of purposes.

Got it? Good. Now let’s go through the types of integrations Wufoo offers.

Real Time Notification Integrations

Real time notification integrations are the types of integrations that I described before. When a new entry is submitted to one of your forms, the data for your entry is automatically and immediately sent over to the integration partner.

A great example of a real time notification integration is Wufoo’s integration with MailChimp. Say you have a Mailing List sign up form on your site and whenever someone signs up, you want their contact information to be automatically added into MailChimp so that you can easily email them.

Using the MailChimp integration, you can connect your form to your MailChimp account, and whenever a new entry is submitted to your form, their contact information is automatically and immediately added to your MailChimp mailing list. No more having to copy and paste data and information from Wufoo to another site.

Sounds awesome, right? It gets even better because Wufoo has 32 real time notification partners from Asana, to Salesforce, all the way down to Z with a Zapier integration.

Think that’s all? Wrong. There’s more!

Payment Integrations

If you’re looking to accept payments through your Wufoo forms, you’re in luck. Wufoo offers integrations with seven payment servicesStripe, PayPal, Braintree, Authorize.Net, Chargify, USA ePay, and FreshBooks—so you’ll be able to accept online payments with your preferred payment service.

I won’t go into too much detail about our payments integrations here other than they’re ridiculously easy to setup and your business can easily start accepting payments online. You can find more info about each payment service by visiting our Payments Integration information page. If you’re interested in a deeper dive into each of the payment services, our very own Aubriane Taylor walked through each service in a payments blog post and helps you choose the best service based on your needs and their features.

3rd Party Application Integrations

These next set of integrations are our 3rd party application integrations. These integrations believe in the value of Wufoo so much that they’ve incorporated access to our features and the data collected by your Wufoo forms on their side of the fence.

These integrations easily allow you to embed your Wufoo forms into their apps or sites (like adding your Wufoo mailing list form to your site with website creators such as Squarespace, Wix, Strikingly, Yola, or Spacecraft), or adding a Wufoo form to your Facebook page). These integrations allow you to add your Wufoo goodness to their apps and web sites and make enhance the features of apps you use.

Mobile Application Integrations

If you’re on the go, these mobile application integrations allow you to take your Wufoo data with you. These integrations allow you to use your mobile phone or tablet to accept entries to your Wufoo forms (like with Entries) , or to create mobile optimized web sites and add Wufoo to them (like with Mojaba). Just really cool integrations with mobile in mind.

Content Management System Integrations

If you use WordPress, Drupal, Confluence, or other content management systems to run your site and business and you’d like to add some Wufoo goodness, you’re in the right place. Wufoo offers several integrations for content management systems and allow you to seamlessly add your Wufoo forms into your CMS and accept entries and submissions from your users and customers right within your CMS driven site.


With all of these Wufoo integrations, you can truly extend and enhance the functionality of your Wufoo account and forms. There are so many integrations and so many use cases and work flows that it would be impossible to cover them all in one blog post. You can read more about all of Wufoo’s integrations to find the right one for you and your work flow.

If you use one of Wufoo’s integrations in a cool or novel way, share it in the comments and let your fellow readers know!


We’ve Added Nearly 200 New Templates to the Wufoo Form Template Gallery!

By Johan Lieu · June 4th, 2014

To help you, our wonderful Wufoo customers, save even more time and get back to doing what you do best we’ve added nearly 200 brand new and high quality form templates to our template form gallery. That means that we now have more than 350 form templates for you to use to save time and get a jump start on your data collection.

We’ve got everything from a Team Performance form to help you get started with employee and team reviews, to a Membership form to help clubs, groups, and companies start receiving membership applications.

We have a boat load of registration forms like our nifty Neighborhood Events form to help you throw events and build a community in your neighborhood, and even a Family Reunion Registration form to help get the whole family back together again.

If you’re using Wufoo forms to run your business, make sure to not miss our Lead Generation forms like our Business to Business form that lets your potential business customers the ability to let you know what they are looking for. And don’t miss our Survey forms like our Market Research survey form, designed to get you a jump start on collecting quality information about your customers. Ready to make your company, product, and service even more awesome? Yeah, we thought so.

No matter what kind of form you’re looking to create with Wufoo, we’re pretty sure you’ll be able to find it in our template form gallery. You can also use one that’s similar to what you want and customize it, saving you lots of time in creating your form so you can start receiving useful data that much more quickly.

Missing a form that you’re sure others would like to use too? Let us know in the comments!


How to Make Those Forms of Yours Personal with Templating

By Aubriane Taylor · June 3rd, 2014

Ready to get personal? With those online forms of yours, that is. Good, because we’re amped to show you the ins and outs of our groovy Templating feature so that you can make your forms more personal in a (sometimes) impersonal digital world. So Templating…What are we talking about exactly?

Let’s go back to the world of event planning and RSVPs, shall we? Say you’re following the advice of our fellow tips blogger, Kane, when planning that wedding extravaganza. You’re using Wufoo to rush along the invite process so you can dish out that delish free food. Being the planning pro that you are, you want to confirm your guests’ RSVPs with a message that includes what meal John or Sally chose, which inbox to check for the confirmation email, and (just for the fun of it) their specific ID number.

We’ll use Templating to make all of this happen! Seriously—it’s fast, easy and fun.

Okay…but how?

First: the form. We’ll follow Johan’s guidance, and set up the entire form first. A few fields to ask who they are, if they’re coming, their preferred menu, and if they’ll bring a plus one:

We’ve set up a few field rules so that we can dynamically show follow-up fields based on the user’s response. What’s a Wufoo form without some Wufoo magic?

Now, here’s the really fun part. We’re going to set up a confirmation page specific to each user’s RSVP, which includes all of the details they just typed in.

1. Find your Field IDs

There are a couple of links that will always pop up when you set up your confirmation options—whether it’s a redirect, a confirmation email, a notification email, whatever. The two links you’ll see are known as Templating Options, and Template Tags (aka API Settings):

Templating Options will take you to our Help page on the templating feature, and Template Tags will take you to the “key” for the field identifiers in your form. Now, here’s the key for the form we just created:

In your case, we’ll want to use our friend’s first name (field 1), their email address (field 5), and their chosen menu (field 6). We’ll also use the entry ID, since we want the user to know their place in the list.

2. Plug in your Template Tags

When you’re putting together your templated text, the default format for a template tag is {entry:Field#}, where “#” is the number of the field I want populated. This changes a bit for “system fields” like the entry ID, but still the same idea: {entry:EntryId}. The tags are case-specific, so make sure you type it exactly as it appears!

Here’s the code you’ll use:

Awesome, {entry:Field1}!! We are so excited to see you on our special day. We’re sending the full details to {entry:Field5} as we speak.

We’ll see you July 20th—-come ready to eat {entry:Field6}, show off your epic dance moves, and make totally merry with us.

PS. You’re #{entry:EntryId} on the guest list.

3. Sit back and watch the magic happen

Here’s the confirmation page I see after I RSVP:

And that’s all there is to it. Each new user to fill out your form will see a confirmation page tailored specifically to them—spooky fun, right?

You can also follow the same concept in confirmation emails, form rules, notifications of new entries, or (to a limited degree) redirects to another site. Outside the world of the hallowed RSVPs, just think of all the other possibilities—order numbers, event registrations, mad libs for your friends…we could go on and on.

I’ll be keeping a hawk’s eye on the comments below for brainstorming of cool ways to use templating in your form. Feel free to drop any questions you might have below!


Back To Basics: The Amazing Activity Log

By Johan Lieu · May 29th, 2014

In this edition of our Back To Basics series, we’re going to take a quick look at an under appreciated Wufoo feature, the Activity Log. As always, the Back to Basic series is geared toward newer Wufoo customers who might not yet be familiar with the wide variety and breadth of Wufoo features. If you’re a Wufoo Vet, this might be a bit too basic for you, but if you do stick around, I bet you’ll still be able to learn a thing or three!

If you’ve ever wondered or needed to remember what exactly you did in your Wufoo account, the Activity Log is your friend. To access the Activity Log, simply head to your Account page and click the button in the top right labeled, “Activity Log”. This’ll take you to a page that looks suspiciously like a log of all of your account’s activity that runs in reverse chronological order, which is exactly what it is!

From this page you’ll be able to view all of the activity that has occurred in your account for the past 45 days. This log is super powerful and useful especially if you have many sub-users on your account (which we talked about creating in our last Back To Basics post about User Management). From within the Activity Logs, you’ll be able to view information about:

  • Forms: You’ll be able to see what users created, edited, or deleted forms from your account and when they did so. You’ll also be able to see when themes are changed for a form or when a form has become inactive.
  • Entries: Rather than overload the Activity Log with each entry submitted, you can view when your entries are edited or deleted.
  • Reports: You’ll be able to see when reports are created, edited, or deleted and by what users. You’ll also be able to keep track of when passwords are turned on and off for reports.
  • Themes: You’ll be able to see when themes are created, edited, or deleted as well as who did it.
  • User Activity: You’ll be able to find out when a user logs in or out of your account.
  • Account Activity: We keep track of whenever your account upgrades, downgrades its subscription plan, and whenever you change your billing information.

As you can see, the Activity Log is your go-to tool whenever you need to remember when you did something related to your Wufoo account, or when you’re trying to figure who’s responsible for that really ugly theme (not me!) and when they did it. It’s great for troubleshooting changes to your forms and it’s also especially handy when you have many users on your account.

Need more information about the Activity Log? View our help documentation about it here. If you’ve got other nifty tips or tricks when using the Activity Log, feel free to share it with the rest of the Wufoo community below!


  • Search

  • About

    The Wufoo Blog is the official online publication written by the developers of Wufoo about their online form builder, form-related technologies, and whatever else may fit their fancy—like robots.

  • Archives