The Wufoo Blog

Archive of Tips & Tricks

The Dos and Don’ts of Form Fields

By Jen Bjers · July 8th, 2014

Hey there, form fans! We’re back again to share more form-building best practices with you—the Dos and Don’ts of form design if you will. Today, I’ll go over the Dos and Don’ts of the fantastic Form Field. Being the forward thinker that you are, intuitive form design is clutch for a positive user experience, but the types of fields you use to collect that data is crucial when it comes to reporting and compiling that information down the road.

Recently, Johan shared 3 Things You Definitely Should NOT Do On Your Forms. I’ll expand on that by highlighting some best practices when choosing field types to collect your data. This guide will cover a handful of Standard and Fancy Pants field types along with tidbits of insight on Field and Form Settings.

Ready? Let’s do this.

I’ve created a form to collect registration information for this summer’s Dino Camp for kids (aka Jr. Archaeologists). This form uses various field types in a way that negatively impacts the user experience as well as potentially skews your data on the backend.

Click on the images below and check out the pointers called out in the field examples:

A few additional resources to help build excellent online forms:

Using Section Breaks to Make Your Forms Easier to Fill Out!

Dynamic Fields for Allowing More than One Camper to Signup per Form

The Science Behind Field Label Placement and Why Top Aligned is Suggested

How to Accept a Terms of Service Agreement

Additional questions for Jen? You know where to go, dear readers.

Back to Basics: How to Search and Export in the Entry Manager

By Zachary Ralson · July 3rd, 2014

Welcome back to another Back to Basics, form fans! So you’ve built that spiffy form of yours (congrats) and now you’re watching all those entries come rolling in (awesome). And rolling in. And rolling in. Sometimes it can feel a little overwhelming to go through all of those submissions and having to wade through the Entry Manager to get the perfect view of the results you’re looking for. If you have 60 results (or even 6 or 600) and you want to get some of them to your friends and colleagues for review, it can be tough to sort through them all to make sure the right data gets to the right place. Fortunately, the Entry Manager’s versatile functionality allows you to filter and export your results so you can make the most of all those form submissions.

The Search Bar

First, let’s look at the Search bar. Much like the legendary Sasquatch, despite its power this feature spends most of its time in hiding. If you click into the bar itself you’re able to search all of your entries for whatever information you’re looking for. But trust us, the search bar is so much more than that.

If you click the magnifying glass icon to the left, the filter options will appear above the entries. You’re able to add filter criteria to limit the Entry Manager display. Most of the time this process is pretty straightforward. Say you wanted to find a list of all Canadian customers with government mailing addresses…You can apply a filter to “Display entries that meet all of the following conditions” add “Country contains Canada” and “Email contains @government.ca” filters to the manager. You’re then able to base filters on any of the fields in your form and use the following conditions:

• Contains • Does not contain • Begins with • Ends with • Is equal to • Is not equal to

There are a few situations where the filter criteria isn’t as simple as the above examples. For example, if you’re filtering by the number of stars provided in a Rating field, you’ll need to use a numeral to represent the number of stars. If you’re sorting by a checkbox option, you’ll need to use the label of the checkbox to successfully filter things. What do we mean exactly? Say the checkbox is labeled, “Yes, I would like to attend your event” and you’d like to find everyone who checked it, you’ll need to say, ‘Yes, I would like to attend your event’ is equal to ‘Yes, I would like to attend your event.’”. If the checkbox is selected then the answer is the same as the label.

Bulk Actions

Now that you’ve limited your search to only your Canadian customers, you want to export those results so you can email them to that naysayer who said you’d never make it big in Toronto (pfft). You can do this by using the Bulk Actions button, conveniently located to the left of the search bar! On the right side of the entry display the Export and Delete buttons will appear.

The Export button allows you to export all entries that are currently displaying in the Entry Manager. If you have no filters applied, this will export all of your entries, if you do have filters applied, only the specified entries will be exported. You’ll have three different format options, as well: Excel (.xls), text (.txt), and Commas (.csv).

The Delete Button is in the same Bulk Actions window as the export button, but it’s key not to mix these up. It operates under the same rules as the Export button—it will only delete those entries that are visible. Need to get rid of any unpaid entries? Go ahead and use the filter to sort them out and just hit Delete.

There you have it, dear form fans. We hope that overwhelming feeling has disappeared into thin air and don’t be shy—let us know if you have questions below!

Back To Basics: Wufoo Integrations

By Johan Lieu · June 13th, 2014

It’s time for another edition of our Back To Basics series. In this edition, we’re going to take a look at Wufoo’s integrations with other applications and web sites and show how they can save you time, make your life easier, and make your Wufoo forms powerful and extensible.

As always, our Back To Basics series is aimed at newer Wufoo customers and users who might not yet be familiar with the wealth of features Wufoo offers. It might be too simplistic for some Wufoo Vets but I bet if you stick around, you might learn something new that you can do with Wufoo. And if not, you might be able to share your experiences with other Wufoo users and help make everyone’s life that much better. Either way, onward!

What Are Integrations?

If you’re not familiar with the idea of integrations, here’s your crash course. Integrations are features Wufoo and other sites have built that allow you to extend the functionality of your Wufoo account and forms.

Most Wufoo integrations work by connecting your Wufoo account or form to a 3rd party application or web site. After connecting, new entries submitted to your Wufoo forms will be automatically sent over to the 3rd party app or web site where the entry can be parsed, processed, and used for a bunch of purposes.

Got it? Good. Now let’s go through the types of integrations Wufoo offers.

Real Time Notification Integrations

Real time notification integrations are the types of integrations that I described before. When a new entry is submitted to one of your forms, the data for your entry is automatically and immediately sent over to the integration partner.

A great example of a real time notification integration is Wufoo’s integration with MailChimp. Say you have a Mailing List sign up form on your site and whenever someone signs up, you want their contact information to be automatically added into MailChimp so that you can easily email them.

Using the MailChimp integration, you can connect your form to your MailChimp account, and whenever a new entry is submitted to your form, their contact information is automatically and immediately added to your MailChimp mailing list. No more having to copy and paste data and information from Wufoo to another site.

Sounds awesome, right? It gets even better because Wufoo has 32 real time notification partners from Asana, to Salesforce, all the way down to Z with a Zapier integration.

Think that’s all? Wrong. There’s more!

Payment Integrations

If you’re looking to accept payments through your Wufoo forms, you’re in luck. Wufoo offers integrations with seven payment servicesStripe, PayPal, Braintree, Authorize.Net, Chargify, USA ePay, and FreshBooks—so you’ll be able to accept online payments with your preferred payment service.

I won’t go into too much detail about our payments integrations here other than they’re ridiculously easy to setup and your business can easily start accepting payments online. You can find more info about each payment service by visiting our Payments Integration information page. If you’re interested in a deeper dive into each of the payment services, our very own Aubriane Taylor walked through each service in a payments blog post and helps you choose the best service based on your needs and their features.

3rd Party Application Integrations

These next set of integrations are our 3rd party application integrations. These integrations believe in the value of Wufoo so much that they’ve incorporated access to our features and the data collected by your Wufoo forms on their side of the fence.

These integrations easily allow you to embed your Wufoo forms into their apps or sites (like adding your Wufoo mailing list form to your site with website creators such as Squarespace, Wix, Strikingly, Yola, or Spacecraft), or adding a Wufoo form to your Facebook page). These integrations allow you to add your Wufoo goodness to their apps and web sites and make enhance the features of apps you use.

Mobile Application Integrations

If you’re on the go, these mobile application integrations allow you to take your Wufoo data with you. These integrations allow you to use your mobile phone or tablet to accept entries to your Wufoo forms (like with Entries) , or to create mobile optimized web sites and add Wufoo to them (like with Mojaba). Just really cool integrations with mobile in mind.

Content Management System Integrations

If you use WordPress, Drupal, Confluence, or other content management systems to run your site and business and you’d like to add some Wufoo goodness, you’re in the right place. Wufoo offers several integrations for content management systems and allow you to seamlessly add your Wufoo forms into your CMS and accept entries and submissions from your users and customers right within your CMS driven site.


With all of these Wufoo integrations, you can truly extend and enhance the functionality of your Wufoo account and forms. There are so many integrations and so many use cases and work flows that it would be impossible to cover them all in one blog post. You can read more about all of Wufoo’s integrations to find the right one for you and your work flow.

If you use one of Wufoo’s integrations in a cool or novel way, share it in the comments and let your fellow readers know!

How to Make Those Forms of Yours Personal with Templating

By Aubriane Taylor · June 3rd, 2014

Ready to get personal? With those online forms of yours, that is. Good, because we’re amped to show you the ins and outs of our groovy Templating feature so that you can make your forms more personal in a (sometimes) impersonal digital world. So Templating…What are we talking about exactly?

Let’s go back to the world of event planning and RSVPs, shall we? Say you’re following the advice of our fellow tips blogger, Kane, when planning that wedding extravaganza. You’re using Wufoo to rush along the invite process so you can dish out that delish free food. Being the planning pro that you are, you want to confirm your guests’ RSVPs with a message that includes what meal John or Sally chose, which inbox to check for the confirmation email, and (just for the fun of it) their specific ID number.

We’ll use Templating to make all of this happen! Seriously—it’s fast, easy and fun.

Okay…but how?

First: the form. We’ll follow Johan’s guidance, and set up the entire form first. A few fields to ask who they are, if they’re coming, their preferred menu, and if they’ll bring a plus one:

We’ve set up a few field rules so that we can dynamically show follow-up fields based on the user’s response. What’s a Wufoo form without some Wufoo magic?

Now, here’s the really fun part. We’re going to set up a confirmation page specific to each user’s RSVP, which includes all of the details they just typed in.

1. Find your Field IDs

There are a couple of links that will always pop up when you set up your confirmation options—whether it’s a redirect, a confirmation email, a notification email, whatever. The two links you’ll see are known as Templating Options, and Template Tags (aka API Settings):

Templating Options will take you to our Help page on the templating feature, and Template Tags will take you to the “key” for the field identifiers in your form. Now, here’s the key for the form we just created:

In your case, we’ll want to use our friend’s first name (field 1), their email address (field 5), and their chosen menu (field 6). We’ll also use the entry ID, since we want the user to know their place in the list.

2. Plug in your Template Tags

When you’re putting together your templated text, the default format for a template tag is {entry:Field#}, where “#” is the number of the field I want populated. This changes a bit for “system fields” like the entry ID, but still the same idea: {entry:EntryId}. The tags are case-specific, so make sure you type it exactly as it appears!

Here’s the code you’ll use:

Awesome, {entry:Field1}!! We are so excited to see you on our special day. We’re sending the full details to {entry:Field5} as we speak.

We’ll see you July 20th—-come ready to eat {entry:Field6}, show off your epic dance moves, and make totally merry with us.

PS. You’re #{entry:EntryId} on the guest list.

3. Sit back and watch the magic happen

Here’s the confirmation page I see after I RSVP:

And that’s all there is to it. Each new user to fill out your form will see a confirmation page tailored specifically to them—spooky fun, right?

You can also follow the same concept in confirmation emails, form rules, notifications of new entries, or (to a limited degree) redirects to another site. Outside the world of the hallowed RSVPs, just think of all the other possibilities—order numbers, event registrations, mad libs for your friends…we could go on and on.

I’ll be keeping a hawk’s eye on the comments below for brainstorming of cool ways to use templating in your form. Feel free to drop any questions you might have below!

Back To Basics: The Amazing Activity Log

By Johan Lieu · May 29th, 2014

In this edition of our Back To Basics series, we’re going to take a quick look at an under appreciated Wufoo feature, the Activity Log. As always, the Back to Basic series is geared toward newer Wufoo customers who might not yet be familiar with the wide variety and breadth of Wufoo features. If you’re a Wufoo Vet, this might be a bit too basic for you, but if you do stick around, I bet you’ll still be able to learn a thing or three!

If you’ve ever wondered or needed to remember what exactly you did in your Wufoo account, the Activity Log is your friend. To access the Activity Log, simply head to your Account page and click the button in the top right labeled, “Activity Log”. This’ll take you to a page that looks suspiciously like a log of all of your account’s activity that runs in reverse chronological order, which is exactly what it is!

From this page you’ll be able to view all of the activity that has occurred in your account for the past 45 days. This log is super powerful and useful especially if you have many sub-users on your account (which we talked about creating in our last Back To Basics post about User Management). From within the Activity Logs, you’ll be able to view information about:

  • Forms: You’ll be able to see what users created, edited, or deleted forms from your account and when they did so. You’ll also be able to see when themes are changed for a form or when a form has become inactive.
  • Entries: Rather than overload the Activity Log with each entry submitted, you can view when your entries are edited or deleted.
  • Reports: You’ll be able to see when reports are created, edited, or deleted and by what users. You’ll also be able to keep track of when passwords are turned on and off for reports.
  • Themes: You’ll be able to see when themes are created, edited, or deleted as well as who did it.
  • User Activity: You’ll be able to find out when a user logs in or out of your account.
  • Account Activity: We keep track of whenever your account upgrades, downgrades its subscription plan, and whenever you change your billing information.

As you can see, the Activity Log is your go-to tool whenever you need to remember when you did something related to your Wufoo account, or when you’re trying to figure who’s responsible for that really ugly theme (not me!) and when they did it. It’s great for troubleshooting changes to your forms and it’s also especially handy when you have many users on your account.

Need more information about the Activity Log? View our help documentation about it here. If you’ve got other nifty tips or tricks when using the Activity Log, feel free to share it with the rest of the Wufoo community below!

How to Build a Rapport with Reports

By Kane Stanley · May 6th, 2014

I’ve never been to a wedding I didn’t enjoy. They’re brilliant. You have a bit of free food, get a dance in there, meet some people, listen to a few speeches and then you’re done. Not all of them go completely to plan, but for the most part they’re usually a success.

Planning that kind of success can sometimes be a real bother but it’s cool. Wufoo is always here to make things that much easier for you. With those summer weddings on the horizon, today I’m going to take you through how to use a Wufoo form and a report to turn the RSVPester process into a RSVParty.

First we have to make the RSVP form. Luckily we make that mega easy for you, because there’s a template for it. It’s no secret that we have loads of form templates to choose from and a wedding invitation is just one of those.

Check out our wedding template.

Once you’ve added that to your account, you can edit it as much as you’d like. I doubt all of you are called Mike and Jenny so I’m sure that will be changed around a bit. Then send that form out there for people to RSVP.

After a while, you’ll realize that you have a bunch of entries to your form and you need to make some sense of it all. This is where the reports come in. We can build a great report to make reading all of this data super easy and make planning your wedding a bit less stressful.

To get to the reports section of your account, you simply click the Reports tab at the top of your page when logged in. Let’s start with who’s coming shall we? For this we can use a few Number Widgets. These nifty widgets will do a simple total count of an option in a field. Perfect when you want to know how many people are coming to your wedding. After creating your new report, click the “Add Widgets” tab and you can add your widgets from there. We have Yes, No, Naybe and guests options so we’ll need four number widgets.

Lovely jubbly. Now we’ll know exactly how many people are coming to the wedding without having to do any annoying manual counting. Hang on a minute, I said that I loved that I get a bit of free food at weddings. How do we know how much food to get?

Let’s use a bar graph for this one. This will let us see all of the options from a field together in one widget rather than getting a count on them separately. When you add a graph widget to a report, you have the choice of using a bar, line or pie graph. A bar graph will be our best bet here.

Brilliant. Now we know how many people are coming to the wedding and exactly what they want to eat. You’ll want to make another graph for the guests food as well. You can probably feel the wedding planning stress falling away as you read this.

Now, what if we actually want to see a breakdown of all the people coming to the wedding with all of the information from their entry? The number count and food count do tell you a lot, but they don’t tell you if the embarrassing uncle that tells awkward jokes will be there. The datagrid widget will though! The datagrid widget will essentially show you each entry in a big list, which is nice if you want to see the names of everyone coming to your wedding.

Now that we have all of that together, let’s have a look at the report. Remember that you can use your themes in the report as well so you can make it look as fancy as you want.

Doesn’t that look nice? Apparently my wedding is pretty small and I’ll need to have a word with the two people that are washing their hair that night, but there you have it.

If you’re getting married, relieve a bit of stress by sending out your RSVP’s through Wufoo. You’ll want to marry us when you’re done.

Questions for Kane? Marriage proposals optional. ;)

How to Create Practice Quizzes & Tests With Wufoo

By Johan Lieu · May 1st, 2014

The number of things you can use Wufoo for far outnumbers the amount of stars in the Milky Way (it does not but it’s a lot!) and I’ll be showing you just one more cool thing you can do with Wufoo. This time we’re going to use Wufoo to create a practice test (or quiz if you’re so inclined) that students can use during studying to help prepare for their exams.

Let’s get started!

1. Create Your Test

The first thing we need to do is create the form for our test. For our example, we’re going to be creating a test about the American Revolution (or if you’re like our very own Kane Stanley, you know it as the American Rebellion). Plus, I’m actually a U.S. History major (Go UCLA!) so this is me totally geeking out here.

Anyhow, the best way to begin creating your test is by laying out all of the questions for your test first. We’ll layer in the section breaks and rules once that’s all in place.

For your questions, I suggest using the multiple choice field type for best results and keeping the number of question options to three. When you’re finished, you should have something that looks like this:

One last thing we need to do is for each question, we want to unselect the radio button so that no answer is selected by default. Other than being a downer if the correct answer is already selected, it also messes with our rules, so make sure you unselect any radio buttons for each of your questions.

2. Add Those Section Breaks

Since our students will be using this practice test to help them study, we should give them feedback as they give their answers so they can learn as they go. To do this, we’ll be using the amazing section break to give instant feedback to the test taker as they answer each question.

Head back to the Form Builder of your test and this time, we’re going to be layering in section breaks for each question. We’re going to place two section breaks before each question, one that displays if the answer is correct and one that displays if the answer is incorrect.

Take a look at our example.

As you can see, I’ve added two section breaks ahead of each question. I added some styling to display the correct section break as green and incorrect ones as red. I also added some context to reinforce why each section break was displaying (showing background information for the correct answer and info about which question was incorrect).

Now that we’ve created these two section breaks for each question in your test, it’s time to add some real magic and use our handy-dandy Rules feature. Why? Read on!

3. Field Rules Make Everything Better

Now that you’ve navigated to the Rules Builder for your test, we’re going to create some Field Rules to show and hide those section breaks on your test. It’s no fun if the answers are shown ahead of time.

For each question, we’ll be creating two field rules. The first rule we’ll create will let you show the correct answer section break if the answer to the question is correct. The second rule we’ll create will allow you to show the incorrect answer section break, if the answer to that question is wrong. You can see two such rules here:

The first rule is set to show the correct answer section break for Question #1 if the answer is correct. And the second rule is setup to show the incorrect answer section break if the answer to the question is any of the two other answers.

As you can imagine, the number of section breaks can get out of hand if you’re creating a fairly long form, which is why we setup the form so that the section breaks appear before each question. It not only helps the student who is taking the test to see if their answer is correct, but it also helps you as the form creator when we setup the test. How so? All of your fields will show up in order in the Rule Builder:

As you can see, the corresponding section breaks for Question #1 appear above it, the section breaks for Question #2 appear before Question #2, and so on. It just helps when you’re setting up complex rules to set it up your fields like this. Now, setup all of the section break rules for each of your questions and save your rules.


That’s it! Your test is now setup. Your students can take advantage of these practice quizzes by testing their knowledge and get instant feedback on how they’re doing, i.e. is there more study time on the horizon or no? The Field Rules you’ve added will easily display messages to the student as well so they can teach and empower themselves as they go. Want to see this form in action? No problem. You can view this form here.

And this isn’t limited to just educators either. Creating these practice forms and quizzes can be incredibly useful for companies too. For example, those that have internal training programs, for testing employees on new processes, or any number of other use cases.

Got a good use case for using Wufoo as a testing platform? Let us know in the Comments below!

How to Choose a Payment Processor from Our Integrations

By Aubriane Taylor · April 10th, 2014

If you’re still collecting checks and envelopes of wrinkly dollars from friends and family, you might be curious about how to automate the process with Wufoo. You may also be sniffing around Wufoo for event registrations and order forms, but you just don’t know which payment processor to choose. Well, friends—this is the WuBlogPost for you!

On the Bona Fide plan and higher, Wufoo offers a payment integration feature that allows you to redirect your users to submit their payment. The list of integrations can be pretty intimidating to consider, but here’s the quick-and-easy breakdown:

For Simple Payments

Stripe

Stripe is super simple. Super super simple, in fact. They have a really easy, fixed-rate pricing model (2.9% + $0.30 per transaction in USD), and you can sign up right from the Wufoo Payment Settings page.

With Stripe, there’s no requirement to have an extra merchant account. The money you collect will be deposited in your bank account on a rolling 7-day basis, so you’re, like, always getting paid.

PayPal Standard

If you haven’t heard of PayPal, you’re likely living under a rock that blocks WiFi. PayPal has a simple pricing model too, and you won’t need a separate merchant account. Plus, it’s extremely easy to set up. Just try. In the time it took you to read that last sentence, we bet you’re already gtg.

One neat perk to the PayPal integration is the option to set up recurring billing. If you’ve got an Us Weekly magazine subscription on offer, you can automatically debit your users’ PayPal account every seven days, or charge ‘em for four issues a month.

For Businessess

Braintree

Braintree is basically the Stripe for businesses - simple pricing (no monthly fee!) and simple sign-up. Unlike your Simple Payments solutions, you’ll need a merchant account for handling the money side of things, but Braintree has bundled a merchant account into their standard pricing.

Check out the Braintree 101 to get a feel for things.

PayPal Website Payments Pro

If you’ve got lots of cash flow per month, and you’re a business in the US, Canada, or stately Great Britain, Website Payments Pro is a solid solution for you. Unlike PayPal Standard, payment is all integrated with your Wufoo form, creating a really seamless ordering process.

The good news: you won’t need a merchant account with WPP. In other news: you will need a Business or Premier account, which can take a day or two to set up. More details here.

PayPal Payflow Pro

If you’re a business in the global market (aka not the US, not Canada, and not stately Great Britain), you’d be better off checking out Payflow Pro.

Payflow is gateway-only, meaning you will need a separate merchant account. It can take a few (to several) days to set up with Payflow, so it may only be worth it if you’re bent on sticking with your own merchant. If you are, though - full steam ahead!

Authorize.net

If you’re ever Googled “trusted payment provider for small businesses”, Authorize.net should be ringing a few bells. You’ll need a merchant account if you want to get paid, but Authorize.net has a directory of merchants for you to choose from.

If you’re looking to accept payments through bank transfer, take note! Your form’s integrated payment page can be enabled to accept eCheck payments with Authorize.net, and you’ll be eReady to eRoll.

USA ePay

If I had to call USA ePay by any other name, it’d be “Old Reliable”. USA ePay’s been around since practically the dawn of the Internet - or at least the dawn of PCI compliance.

You’ll need your own merchant account to get started. Whenever you’re ready to go, you can sign up to use USA ePay as your payment gateway through a respectable list of resellers.

For Customer Management

Chargify

To put it simply, Chargify is your subscription management center. You can create a product and specify a subscription period, and users connecting to Chargify can submit their payment info for recurring payments through your chosen gateway.

Chargify is not a payment gateway or a merchant account, so you will need your own. The good news is that you can leverage Stripe (our favorite friend), Braintree, Authorize.net, PayPal, or any of their other partners to get that money.

Freshbooks

If you’re looking less for “pay now”, and more for “sign up and pay later”, Freshbooks is your best bet. You can collect all the details needed to generate an invoice - no CC required - and let the customer pay up later on.

Payment can be collected online through PayPal (all flavors), Stripe, Authorize.net, Braintree, eWay, and a number of other payment providers. You can even weigh the benefits of your options (in even greater depth than this here blog post) on Freshbooks’ site right here!

The Conclusion

And there you have it—little more sense to the dollars and cents. Of course, let us know below in the comments if you have any q’s.

Fear Not, Form Fans! Import Those Predefined Choices

By Jen Bjers · April 8th, 2014

Have a lengthy list of choices for a Drop-down or Multiple Choice field? Does the thought of typing each selection one by one make your soul cry? Enter Wufoo’s ‘Import Predefined Choices’ feature. If you have a text list or even an Excel list on hand, then copy and paste that list directly into the Import Predefined Choices utility. Magically, Wufoo converts that list into choices in your Multiple Choice or Drop-down field.

Let’s see it in action!

Suppose you’d like all entries to select the country they’re contacting you from, but find no need to include an entire Address field. A quick Google search for “text list of countries” returns a short list of hits (~66 million). I find that the OpenConcept text list of countries works well for this.

Add a Drop-down field on your form and click on the Import Predefined Choices button in the Field Settings.

You’ll find a list of Predefined Categories such as Gender, Age, Employment, Continents, Income, Education, etc. And, you’ll notice an open area to the right of the categories to paste your own custom list.

Copy the text list of countries from the OpenConcept page and paste that list directly in to the custom choices area of the Import Predefined Choices utility. Click on the Add Choices to Field button.

Bask in the glory of your own awesomeness. Relish in the fruits of your labor. You’ve just added 195 countries to your Dropdown list in less than 2 minutes.

image

Predefining a Checkbox field is certainly possible as well. Since Checkbox fields are stored a little differently in the database, you’ll need to set it up as a Dropdown or Multiple Choice field first. Once you’ve predefined the choices, change the field type to Checkbox and well, that should do it.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this installment of Wufoo Tips and Tricks. As always, we’re here to help if you need anything!

Back To Basics: Getting Down And Dirty With Rules

By Johan Lieu · April 4th, 2014

Okay, maybe not so dirty. But if you’re new to Wufoo and haven’t yet ventured into the infinite (maybe not infinite but it’s a lot) possibilities of Rules yet, you’re missing out. Rules are that extra something that take a fairly simple form and use case and supercharges them to allow you to use Wufoo to solve some fairly complex use cases and applications.

As always, if you consider yourself a Wufoo Vet (and given how many users we have, there are plenty of you out there!) this post may not be for you. The Back To Basics series of posts are aimed at the newer Wufoo users who want to learn more about the wide assortment of Wufoo features and fully unlock the infinite (again, probably not infinite but close) possibilities of their Wufoo accounts.

Let’s get to it.


1. Make The Form!

Before we venture into setting up rules for our form, we first need a form. When setting up a complex form, I like to first create the entire form with all fields and pages, and from there, add rules and make them dynamic.

For our purposes, I’m using a form that I’ve created that uses Stripe with global currencies (a recently launched feature enhancement that allows Stripe users to accept payments in various currencies) so that people can send me bribes for various tasks they want me to do. In this form I have:

A. Price Field: This field allows people to input how much they want to bribe me with.

B. Text Field: This field is an arbitrary field that I want to be shown only if the bribe amount from the Price Field is more than 50.00 GBP.

C. Multiple Choice Field: This field allows the user to let me know if what I need to do is simple or elaborate. If it’s simple, we don’t need a long explanation (I mean, if it’s a simple bribe, why have it in writing, amirite?) so we’ll skip the page with the paragraph box and just get straight to payment. But if the task is elaborate, the user should see the second page, shown here in D.

D. Paragraph Field: This paragraph field appears on the second page. The second page will only be shown to users if they selected “Something much more elaborate” from the multiple choice field in C.

There, we have our form with all of the possible fields and pages. Now it’s time to add Rules and make it really sing.

2. Add A Touch Of Rules

To add rules to our nifty new form, just head to the Form Manager which lists all of your forms. Find your form, click the “Rules” button and you’ll be taken to the Rule Manager for your form. Now it gets fun!

3. Creating A Field Rule

The first rule we’ll be creating is the rule where we’d like to show the text field only if the price is higher than 50.00 GBP. Since this is a rule that will simply show or hide another field on the same page, it’s considered a Field Rule. Simply click the “Create A Field Rule” button and the first field rule will appear.

To make our rule, you select which field you want to monitor, in this case the “What’s your bribe amount?” field. To do this, you click the first drop down menu which lists all of the fields on your form then select the field which you want to create this rule for.

Next, we choose the rule criteria. In this case, we only care if the amount inputted into this field is more than 50.00 GBP. So we choose the criteria drop down and we select “is greater than”. Now we move over to the next input field where we’ll enter in 50.00. Note: for price fields and rules, you’ll need to specify out to the cents (or pence in this example).

Finally, we want to show the text field in our example form, so we’ll choose the last drop down menu and select the field we want to show, in this case we’ll select the “Shown only if the bribe amount is more than 50 GBP!” field. Click “Save Field Rules” and your first rule is all set.

You can see that the rule matches what we are trying to do by simply reading it in the Rule Builder:

If “What’s your bribe amount?” is greater than 50.00 show “Shown only if the bribe amount is more than 50 GBP!”.

Pretty cool huh? Now, let’s tackle that Page Rule.

4. Creating A Page Rule

Remember that we only want people to clarify their bribery task on the second page of the form only if the task is elaborate. So we’ll need to make a rule that only shows the second page of this form if the value of the multiple choice field is “Something much more elaborate.” For that, we need to create a Page Rule. To do that, simply hit the tab labeled, “Page Rules” click the “Create a Page Rule” button, and your first page rule will appear.

Like creating a field rule, we’ll first need to select which field we’ll need to monitor. In this case, it’s the “What do you need to get done?” field.

This is where things get tricky, so pay attention. In the third drop down, instead of selecting “Something much more elaborate.” we’re instead going to select “Something simple.” as the option. We do this since Page Rules allow for skipping pages and we only need to skip the second page in our form if the task is simple. Hence, we choose “Something simple.” here as our option.

Finally, we then close the loop by saying if the option selected is “Something simple.” then we’ll skip all the way to the Payment page, skipping Page 2 altogether. This way only people with elaborate tasks need to describe their task and those with simple tasks can get to paying us our bribe!


And there we have it, a fairly simple form that utilizes Field Rules and Page Rules to add complex functionality to the form and make it super powerful. There are endless possibilities and applications of using Wufoo with Rules to create really elegant solutions to hard, complex problems and workflows. If you want more in depth information about rules, you can find them here in our handy dandy Help Docs about the Rule Builder.

As always, if you have any questions or comments, leave them below. We love to hear from our customers and readers and hope you found this guide useful!

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    The Wufoo Blog is the official online publication written by the developers of Wufoo about their online form builder, form-related technologies, and whatever else may fit their fancy—like robots.

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