The Wufoo Blog

Archive of Tips & Tricks

Newbie Series is Back: Troubleshooting Your Forms

By Cody Curry · February 4th, 2016

Wufoo QuestionsHey there, everyone! Cody here and newest kid on the Wufoo block of product experts. So just like you, I was new to Wufoo once. With a little practice and the good company of our Newbie series, you should be a pro in no time. Sometimes, you just want to get your logo on your form—is that too much to ask? We don’t think so, and I’m going to show you how!

The first thing you’ll need is your logo. “I already have that, Cody.” you’re probably saying. Well, great! Grab that logo, and let’s get it up on the internet. In order to display your logo in Wufoo, you’ll need to host your logo somewhere. Hosting just means you’re uploading that image somewhere that can be viewed by Wufoo whenever it needs it.

Upload your favorite Logo: We suggest hosting your logo using a service like Dropbox.com, HTTPSImage.com, or SSLpic.com. Whatever you decide, you’ll need to find your direct link.

Dropbox

Dropbox is an amazing solution. If you decide to use Dropbox, getting your direct link is easy. Once you’re logged into Dropbox, click on the New Upload button up at the top of the page.

Wufoo Logos blog

You’ll then be able to select your logo and upload it to Dropbox. When the upload is finished, click on Share just to the right of your fresh newly-hosted logo and copy the link that’s provided. Once you have it copied, you’ll need to make one small change. At the end of that link you’ll find a 0, change it to a 1, and you’re all set.

Wufoo Logos blog

It will look like this when you’re done: https://www.dropbox.com/t/4sb2h8crnrm9e3n/bestlogoever.png?dl=1 *And hey, don’t try and click on that link of course, cuz it’s not real.

SSLpic.com

SSLpic.com is great. They’ll email you a copy of your direct link that you can use to get your logo up on Wufoo! They do have a strict no-robot policy when it comes to hosting logos, so you’ll have to make sure you’re not one of those before you use their service.

sslpicupload

If you’re not a robot, then you should be good to go. The direct link you get from them will look something like this: https://static.e-junkie.com/sslpic/65357.518de12jwk29m20ee85b2339.jpg *Same story with this link—it’s not real.

HTTPSimage.com

HTTPSimage.com is another gooder. Your direct link will be provided straight away once you’ve clicked that Upload button. It appears that while they do not allow illegal content to be uploaded, they’ll allow robots here, which is very kind of them.

Host it using SSL

What do all of these hosting options have in common? No one? They all begin with https:// and that’s very important! Who would have thought that one little s could cause so much trouble. Here’s what’s up: In order to view your logo on a secure form, you’ll need to have that s at the end. Logos that are hosted without the s might just not show up, which would be terrible! Only some hosting services allow you to use https. Luckily, all of the options above are nice like that. Make sure your link starts with https:// and you’ll be all set.

Create a Theme

Once you have that fresh new direct link, log into Wufoo and we can get down to business. The first order of business is making a new theme. Themes let you breath life into a stale form by adding all sorts of wonderful patterns and colors. Really great stuff! But don’t let me get side-tracked, we’re here to talk about logos.

Click on Themes up at the top of the page. Create a new theme by selecting Create New from the Theme dropdown. Select Logo from the Properties Menu, and Your Logo from the Logo menu. This will reveal a beautiful field that was custom made to accept your fresh new direct link. Notice the warning above, “Make sure you host your image on SSL to avoid warnings!” As I mentioned earlier, this is serious business, but we’ve done our homework. Our tickets are already paid for, and they’re waiting for us at the box-office of new logos, so pat that warning on the head, tell it to hush, and let’s press forward.

Wufoo Logos blog

Paste your direct link into the field just below that pleasant warning, and click Apply. If your logo appears to be chopped in half, don’t despair. Immediately to the left of that Apply button, you’ll see a field labeled Height. This field will let you adjust how tall you want the space where your logo is displayed. Match this up with the size of your logo through trial-and-error. If you know how tall your logo is, then you’re a smarter human than I am.

Wufoo Logos blog

Wufoo Logos blog

I’m going to change the background of my header to white to match the rest of my theme. Once the preview is looking good, take a sip of water, then click on the big green Save Theme button up in the top-right corner. Specify a Name for your theme—I’m calling mine Henry—then click Submit. Your theme is now saved and ready to be applied to your form!

Applying your Theme

Click on Forms Up at the top of the page, and find an unsuspecting form in your account to test out your new logo-clad theme.

Wufoo Logos blog

View your Form

Hover your mouse over your unsuspecting form and click View. That’s all there is to it!

Wufoo Logos blog

How do I center my logo?

Glad you asked that question. While Wufoo doesn’t have a built-in way to center your logo, we are smarter than Wufoo gives us credit. To get your logo to appear in the center, you’ll need to create an image with a bit of space on each side. The default width of our forms is 640 pixels. This means that if you create an image that is 640 pixels wide with your logo right in the center, you will have your logo centered like a pro.

Wufoo Logos blog

You can also use this technique to adjust the position and padding around your logo without fiddling with any code or scripting.

That’s all I have for you today, folks. You’re well on your way to learning the secrets of Wufoo.

Have tips of your own? Share them with us in the Comments!

Your Burning Questions Answered!

By Joss Unzicker · February 2nd, 2016

Wufoo QuestionsHi Form Friends! Hope your 2016 form building resolutions are off to an auspicious start. For me this year is going to be all about efficiency and making sure that I use my time wisely. With that in mind, I’ll answer three of our most common customer questions with the hope that you can absorb all that important info here and never have to worry about contacting us and waiting a few tantalizing hours for a response. So let’s get to it.

Dear Support,

Why isn’t all my data showing in report/excel export/datagrid?!

Help me, Obi Wan Kenobi!

Sincerely, Worried User

My Dear Padawan,

Not to worry—the force is with you! When you set up a datagrid on a report, that grid is set by default not to show all of the fields from your form. In order to make sure that all of the fields or the fields you want are showing properly, you will need to make changes to the widget settings for that datagrid The steps for making this change are as follow:

  1. Login
  2. Click on the Reports tab at the top of the page
  3. Click on the Edit button for your report
  4. Click on the Datagrid in the preview section of the report builder
  5. The field checkboxes to display will open in the tab above
  6. Select all fields or select individual fields to show
  7. Save Report

ReportBuilderblog

You can learn more here.

Alternatively, you can click the “Allow User to View Columns Not Checked” button in the report settings — this will not add any more fields to the default datagrid, but anyone viewing the datagrid will be able to add them using the green plus sign attached to the grid within the report itself. Additionally, they will be included in an export of that report.

Wufoo Forms

Cheers, Joss Wufoo Support

Wufoo Gurus,

Why am I not receiving my notification emails?

Namaste, Wufoo Yogi

Hi there,

Sorry to hear you’re not receiving Notification emails! Without having a link to the form, I have three guesses as to what could be happening here.

Check your notifications page to make sure that notifications are set to trigger. On the notifications page, the entries box should be ticked.

Wufoo Forms

Know that any form rules will override the notification settings. If you want the email addresses on the notification page to receive all notification emails, then you’ll want to add them to each of the form rules as well. If all the above seem right, it is likely that a firewall is placing our email in a spam folder or blocking the notification entirely. We strongly recommend adding no-reply@wufoo.com and apache@wufoo.com to an email whitelist or “safe senders” list on your email server or account.

Additionally, we recommend trying the notifications with another email address not associated with your domain (such as a Gmail or Yahoo account) just to test if the problem is isolated to that particular email address or domain. If that works, you could set up an email forward from that address to the original address on your domain.

Hope this helps!

Best, Joss Wufoo Support

Even more questions for our wonderful Joss? Let her know below!

Don’t Make These 3 Common Form Design Mistakes

By Johan Lieu · February 1st, 2016

Wufoo QuestionsThe Wufoo Form Builder makes it so easy to add fields and customize their options that sometimes many first time form creators go overboard and end up with a form that, even though it was created with the best of intentions, ends up being totally unusable. This post will help highlight a couple of common form design mistakes that most first-time form creators make.

Ready? Good. Let’s get to it then.

1. Asking For Way Too Much Information

The first common mistake we see with first time form creators is that they usually get carried away with adding fields for information that believe they need to do their jobs and end up with a form that has way too many fields that no one will fill out.

Let’s say you’ve created the most perfect sales lead form with like 80 input fields to make sure you get all of the information from potential customers that you think you may need just in case someone like Mike from Marketing asks for it (like, “Do you have more than three pets in your household?”).

After you’ve got the form complete, you embed it on your site and wait for the submissions from potential customers to come in. And then…nothing. Zero people have filled it out. Uh, what’s going on?

What happened was that potential customers visited your site, got a little bit interested, and were thinking about filling out your More Info form. But then they got to it and saw it was like 80 questions long and were like, “Whoa, that’s way too long of a form for something that I’m not even sure I need” and then they just abandoned your form.

What you need to do is really rethink what information you really, really, really need at this point in time and only have those fields on your form. For most sales lead forms, you’re only going to need someone’s name and a way to get in touch with them, whether it’s an email address or a phone number. That’s probably it. You can find out other info later when you follow up with the potential customer. There’s a ton of research out there that shows that removing even one field can make a huge difference in completion and conversion rates. So make sure you only ask for the information that is extremely crucial for the purpose of your form.

2. Making Everything Required

This is similar to #1 above, so this’ll be short and sweet. After you’ve pared down your 80 input field form down to say, like 11 fields, you decided to make everything required. But I bet that even in those 11 fields, you have some fields that aren’t actually required and you could get away with some submissions not requiring that information.

It can be difficult to have the discussion with whomever thinks that that information is crucial so one way to prove it is to test it. Make the field optional but leave it on the form. Then after a couple days or weeks, follow up to see if that piece of information wasn’t as important as previously thought. If so, you have the data to back it up. And, going back to #1 above, if you find out that you can live with the information being optional, you might want to consider removing it altogether, making your form even shorter, and increasing completion rates overall.

3. Put The Verification Question at the End of Your Form

This one is less of a newbie mistake but it’s something we all do and [recent research])http://www.npr.org/2015/07/22/425377064/planet-money-asks-what-small-thing-would-you-do-to-improve-the-world) has shown we’re all doing it wrong, newbies and veterans alike.

In most forms where the form taker needs to provide truthful information, at the bottom of the form there’s usually a question that says something like:

“I confirm that all information that I’ve provided is true.” “Your Name”

It’s usually a checkbox and a name field and most people kind of gloss over it at the end of the long information providing form. But what usually happens is that some people fudge the info (like your milage in an insurance in take form) but by the time you get down to the bottom of the form to say, “yes all this information is true” you’ve already committed to not providing the actual truthful information so you just check the box and continue on.

Francesca Gino, a professor at Harvard Business School, recently showed that by putting the signing or truth verification question at the top of the form, you’ll actually increase the truthfulness of the information being provided.

“Using lab and field experiments, we find that signing before rather than after the opportunity to cheat makes ethics salient when it is needed most and significantly reduces dishonesty.”

While she tested on forms where people sign at the end, we can apply her learnings on our forms by asking for people’s names and confirm that the information provided is true at the beginning of the form instead of at the end.


Got some other tips you’d like to share? Comment below!

Our Top 4 Form Tips Just for You

By Kayte Korwitts · January 7th, 2016

One year down, people. Say buh-bye to 2015 and helloooo, 2016. And what better way to celebrate the end of something and the beginning of another than with a—wait for it—video roundup? That’s right.

Our trusty expert screen-caster, Kane, has been building a mini library of visual how-tos all year. So in case you missed any of them, we’ve rounded up the top 4 for your convenience.

Enjoy!

How to use the Account Manager

Everything you need to know about managing Entries

Get the low-down on Notifications

Become a pro at Templating

Confused by anything or have questions/comments? Let us know below, we read ‘em all, promise.

How to Create a Wufoo Form in 5 Minutes

By Kane Stanley · November 24th, 2015

Creating Wufoo forms is all about being easy, fast and fun. Well, we wanted to prove it. Give you one guess as to how we decided to do that. That’s right. A five-minute form, people. We whipped together a form complete with notifications, payments and even a report in under 5 minutes.

That’s proper quick when you think about how busy you are during the holidays. If you want to create a form in a fraction of the time it takes to cook a Thanksgiving dinner—check out our video if you please.

Questions for Kane? Let him know in the Comments below!

Catch Our Max Quantities Feature in Action

By Nicola Plate · November 2nd, 2015

CR34_WufooBLOG_Nov15_story3_v1.1iwHello again form-friends! Now that Halloween is over, let’s focus on the next big holiday at hand…THANKSGIVING. Loosen your pants and get ready for a filling how-to on, well, how exactly to take advantage of Wufoo’s most recently added feature to aid your Thanksgiving festivities: Max Quantities.

What are Max Quantities?

Through all the feedback you’ve given us over the years, one thing in particular stood out: many of the Wufoo users wanted a way to limit the amount of times a particular field can be selected.

The Max Quantities feature allows you do to exactly that; you can limit the number of times a specific option can be selected for checkboxes, multiple choice fields, and dropdown fields.

Johan’s blog post gave you a use case example involving clothing but of course, T-shirts aren’t the only thing you can use this fab feature for. Let’s get our brains back on the holiday at hand, shall we? FOOD.

Forks up, people.

Max Quantities and the Thanksgiving feast

Thanksgiving obviously wouldn’t be the same without turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and of course, pie pie, all the pies. But if you’re the cook, food can also be the most stressful part of the holiday. You don’t want to get stuck cooking everything, so how’s about a potluck?

But then, Who’s going to bring what?

This is where Max Quantities comes in. First you have to decide how many appetizers, entrees and desserts you want and then you can create a form for people to volunteer what they would like to bring.

Let’s make sure we have enough options:

  • ONE Turkey, because turkey deserves its own category.
  • FIVE Appetizers
  • FOUR Entrees (other than turkey)
  • UNLIMITED Desserts. You can never have too much dessert.
  • Now, let’s create a multiple choice questions with these choices, but we won’t add the numbers in just yet. Here’s what the form looks like:

    ScreenShotLFQ1

    This is a perfectly fine form as it is. But without Max Quantities enabled, people can click whatever they want. We might end up with 10 turkeys. Or worse…no desserts.

    But when you select the Max Quantities under Option from Field Settings, you can input a number. This limits the amount of total times that someone can select this option.

    But add those Max Quantities in and your form looks like this:

    ScreenShotLQF2

    Once someone selects the “Turkey” option, no one else will be able to select it. Once five people select the “Appetizer” options, no one else will be able to select that. And then anyone can select desserts because that does not have a max quantity associated with it.

    Add in a fall-inspired theme, and you’ll end up with the Thanksgiving Potluck form:

    ScreenShotLQF3

    Happy Thanksgiving from everyone on the Wufoo team and as always, let us know if you have questions or comments below!

    Use Reports and Show Who’s Coming to Your Next Party

    By Johan Lieu · October 29th, 2015

    CR34_WufooBLOG_Nov15_story1_v1.1iw There are a ton of ways you can use Wufoo to help make your life easier. And of course with the holiday season coming up, we know your inbox (or even, gasp, your mailbox) is about to fill up with party invites and thrilling events to come. You’re probably even planning one or three events yourself.

    Now when it comes to party time, we’re more than equipped to manage invitations and registrations for your events. From handling registrations for your organization’s event to wrangling RSVPs for your wedding, Wufoo is the perfect solution for really any kind of event or party you have in mind.

    We want you to head into the peak season for parties feeling totally prepared and with these quick and useful tips for your invitation and event registration forms—you will be. Here’s how to show off who’s coming to your party after your guests have RSVPed.

    Things You’ll Need

    1. You need an invitation or event registration form! You can make one from scratch or take advantage of our invitations form gallery, or our registrations form gallery.
    2. Your invitation form needs to have a name field. Otherwise, how will you know who is coming?!
    3. A report for your form with the datagrid on it.
    4. ???
    5. RSVP awesomeness!

    Since probably only #3 is something you don’t already do every day in Wufoo, let’s walk you through on how to set that up.

    Setup Your Report with a Datagrid

    After you’ve created your form and ensured there’s a name field on it (probably best to make it required too), head on over to the Report Manager. You can get there by clicking the Reports tab.

    Once there, click New Report and you’ll be greeted with the Report Builder. In the first panel, labeled “Report Settings”, enter in a title for your report. We chose the wholly original title of, “Who’s coming to my party?” but you can do whatever you please.

    Next, click on the second panel labeled, “Select Data”. This is where you’ll select what data the report is pulling its data from. This is also where you’ll want to select your invitation form. Ours was titled, “Party Invitation”.

    Thirdly, move onto the third (heh—see what we did there?) panel labeled, “Add Widgets”. This is where we’ll add a data grid widget. You do this by clicking the “Datagrid” button. Do so and a datagrid shall appear on your report.

    Finally, click on your new datagrid and then head on over to the last panel labeled, “Widget Settings”. This is where we’ll customize the data that is presented in the datagrid itself. We’ve chosen to show data from the field, “Can you make it?”, the first and last name of each person, along with their RSVP response.

    After you’ve done this, click the Save button and then let’s head on back to the Report Manager.

    At the Report Manager, find your newly made report. First, click the option that says, “Public”. This makes sure your report is viewable by everyone. Next, click on the button labeled, “Widgets”. You’ll be taken to the Widget Manager for your report. From here, find the “Permanent Shortlink URL” for your report which is located in the “Link to Report” section. Copy this link!

    Now, head back to the Form Builder for your invitation form. In the Form Builder, go to the Form Settings tab and find the “Redirect to Website” option. In here, paste in the URL for your report and then click Save Form.

    Voila! Now whenever one of your guests RSVPs to your event, they’ll be redirected to your report which lists everyone who is coming to your party.

    Got comments or feedback? Let us know in the Comments section below.

    In the meantime? Get to partying, people!

    Field Rules for Newbies: Our Top Tips for Setting Up Form Logic

    By Nicola Plate · October 7th, 2015

    NicolaWe love adding more newbies to the Wufoo family. Join us in giving a high-five to Nicola. Nicola’s joined our team of Support experts in lovely Portland and is here on the blog to whip our special edition Newbie series back into blog gear.

    So if you’re new to Wufoo like she is—this blog’s for you!

    Being new at Wufoo, I’ve been able to drill into tons of different features and use cases but I found myself spending more time in certain areas of the Form Builder than in others. Enter Field Rules.

    Let’s explore Field Rules together, fellow newbies.

    What’s a Field Rule?

    Rules take a form from being static to totally dynamic. They are built with two main parts: the condition and the action. Field Rules, specifically, lets you do two things: SHOW or HIDE fields based on conditions.

    For example, let’s ask people about dinosaurs. Your first question might be, “Do you like dinosaurs?” with Yes or No choices. Your second question might be, “Which dinosaur is your favorite?”

    But if the person doesn’t like dinosaurs, why show them question 2? You’ll only want the people who answer Yes see the question 2.

    You can do this with Field Rules. Here’s how that would be set up:

    Field Rules

    Multiple Conditions - Say what?

    One of the best parts about our Rule Builder is that you can have more than one condition per rule. Let’s add another answer choice to our “Do you like dinosaurs?” question—Maybe. If someone answers Yes or Maybe to question 1, let’s ask them question 2.

    Your rule set up for this will be:

    Show or Hide 2

    Since you want either option to enact the rule, you’ll use an OR operator.

    And that’s just one of many ways that Multiple Conditions can enhance your form experience. Get even more solid info on the magic of Multiple Conditions in our Guides page.

    How do Multiple Field Rules work?

    Let’s invite people to an event. Now if we want people to bring their friends—the more the merrier we always say—we’ll need multiple registrations. As we’ve covered before with regards to Multiple Registrations, this requires a wee bit more attention than your average registration form.

    Let’s ask: “How many people would you like to register?” They can select 1-5 from a drop down menu.

    If they’re inviting 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 people to their event, they’ll need to see the Registration 1 name field. If they’re inviting 2, 3, 4, or 5 people, they need to see the Registration 2 name field. Repeat this pattern, and you’ve mastered multiple registrations!

    Here’s an example of what your first 3 rules for this registration will look like:

    Show or Hide

    Add a payment integration and you’re good to go.

    Oops! Common Rule Mistakes

    Let’s explore one of the most common Field Rule mistakes: to SHOW or to HIDE?

    Back to our first scenario: if someone selects No for the question on whether or not they like dinosaurs, you don’t want them to see the question that asks for their favorite dinosaur.

    You should hide this field, right?

    Wrong. You want a SHOW rule for someone who clicks Yes or Maybe. With a SHOW rule, the field hides itself automatically if the rule is not satisfied.

    In general, SHOW rules are easier for everyone to understand (including the Wufoo Rule builder). If you plan on using field rules on your form, you might want to check out our common mistakes blog to avoid any field-rule-headaches.

    Once you get to know them, Field Rules are a snap to set up and they take your form-building experience from just great to absolutely amazing. who doesn’t want that?

    Thanks for sticking with me through this rule-building fun. Leave your questions for me below and I promise to answer ‘em.

    Was this post helpful, dear newbies? Let us know what else you’d like us to blog about and stay tuned for more!

    All You Need to Know About Analytics

    By Michael Lim · September 2nd, 2015

    Our Analytics tool is full of interesting statistics and percentages for your form, that you won’t find anywhere else. Ensure sure you’re making the most of these tools with this breakdown of the major pieces:

    Pageviews

    This records the number of times your form is loaded. Whether that’s directly through one of our provided links or an embedded form, we help you track the total number of views your form has. This comes in handy when comparing some of the other Analytics data. You can also adjust the timeframe for the view count. The available options allow you to look at the number of views in a single day, month, year, or the last 12 trailing months.

    Pageviews

    Entries

    As one might expect, this is the amount of successful completed entries. Like Pageviews, you can also use different units of time to examine your collected entries. With Entries, we also provide some additional stats, beyond just the total number received in a given timeframe. You can also look at the number of entries received from various countries/regions (and cities), as well as by operating system and browser type. This gives you invaluable insight into where your users are coming from, and what sort of technology they use to access your forms. Additionally, we track some basic referrals, to give you a glimpse at which sources are providing the most completed entries. This can be particularly helpful if you have the same form (such as a signup or contact form) embedded on multiple pages, and you want to see which page is the most successful.

    Entries total

    Conversion Rate

    Since the whole point of making a form is to collect data, why not track how efficient your forms are? The conversion rate we calculate is simply the number of submitted entries, divided by the total number of page views. This gives you an idea of how effective your form is at getting users to view, fill out, and complete an entry. A low conversion rate can be a good indication that you need to make some tweaks

    Conversion Rates

    Error Score

    Error score is probably the most advanced of the analytics options. When an error, such as for field validation or blank Required fields, is triggered, these are counted towards the form’s error score. The total number of errors is divided by the number of successful submissions, to give the score for that particular timeframe. Similar to conversion rate, this measurement can be a signal that you might want to make some changes to your form. It can also lead to additional insights when you examine how error score changes over time. Maybe you find that your users tend to make more errors late at night, or on Friday afternoons, and you can use that information to adjust how and when you distribute or promote your forms.

    Error score

    Average Time

    Average time is pretty simple, just tracking the amount of time each entry takes from page load to submission, and then computing the average for all collected entries. Depending on your goals, you may want users to fill out the form as quickly as possible (to avoid them getting distracted, and hurting conversion) or it may be better for users to take their time (if you have particularly complex question, and you want to avoid mistakes). Average entry time can help you to address any misalignment, and apply some quick fixes, like adjusting your field alignment

    Average time

    Don’t be shy. Let Michael know if you have questions below and check out our Guides page for even more handy tips and tricks!

    How to Perfect the Running Total Feature with CSS

    By Kane Stanley · September 1st, 2015

    We’ve no problem being blunt. The Running Total is such a beautiful feature of Wufoo. The user can fill out the form and see exactly how much they owe as they fill it out. Everything seems clear and well, perfect—right? What could ever go wrong with such a lovely feature? Not much.

    However! It is possible that users may run into one tiny issue. Let’s say you have a longer form with a Running Total, fields next to each other and a long section break in it. When the running total scrolls down with the form, it can get in the way of those other fields.

    Check this out:

    Running Total

    It may not be the prettiest sight you’ve ever seen. Sure, there’s pizza in the background—brightens up anyone’s day of course—but that running total is obscuring the view of some of the fields. The user could scroll back up to see it all again, but it can be a bit of a pain. Luckily, you can use custom CSS to fix that running total to the top of your page so it doesn’t get in the way. It’s proper easy CSS as well:

    Script

    That CSS will tell the running total to stick to the top of the page rather than moving with the form as the user scrolls up and down. As a result, it won’t get in the way of any fields or section breaks in the form. Let’s check out the same form after adding that CSS:

    Final Running Total Result

    Since the CSS has been applied the running total isn’t budging from the top of the page. Now all fields are clearly visible, but the running total remains in the form. Just another way that some simple CSS can improve your form!

    As always, share your burning questions or comments with Kane in the Comments section below!

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      The Wufoo Blog is the official online publication written by the developers of Wufoo about their online form builder, form-related technologies, and whatever else may fit their fancy—like robots.

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